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October is Pregnancy and Infant Loss Awareness month, and it’s important to acknowledge this, raise awareness, and allow mothers touched by special loss to come together and share their experiences. 1 in 4 women are touched by infant loss, which means that even if you haven’t experienced it, someone you know has or will. The difficulty with infant loss is the stigma and discomfort it brings to those around us. This discomfort stems from the stigma that we shouldn’t talk about it, that women should move forward as though nothing has happened. This couldn’t be more wrong. A big part of breaking the stigma comes from talking and understanding. A big part of healing is through the community. We spoke with Sandra Kesselman, MSW, RSW, a Professional Social Work clinician, for forty years. The focus of her work has been in the areas of crisis intervention, grief, and loss. In addition, she…

IE… What!? Any parent knows that there is no official parenting handbook. We’re all just winging it, googling it, and trial and error. For parents of kids with additional needs, this couldn’t be truer. From navigating complex medical issues, behavioral anomalies, etc., the paperwork and processes are tiresome and arduous before they’ve even started school. Then, just when you think you may have it all figured out, school starts, and a new process begins. The problem with these systems is that the industry leaders have years of knowledge; it’s what they do for a living. But it’s up to the parents to navigate this unfamiliar system with no prior training, no handbook, and often little to no support. It can feel like representing yourself at a trial you have no previous knowledge of. Many expressed how concerning, anxiety-inducing, and fear-provoking the initial special education evaluation and IEP meetings can be with…

We’re just a few weeks into the school year, and we’ve finally conquered the back-to-school first-week nerves (not yet? sending love). Just as we start to think to count down the morning struggles and we begin to think that maybe, just maybe, we can handle the morning routine. The moment we let our guard down, thinking we’ve got this, we start to see a new pattern arising—the after-school meltdown. Maybe for your kindie it’s a total out-of-control meltdown, or for your tween, it’s acting quiet and grumpy. However it looks in your household, it’s likely hard to manage. It’s also a little disheartening, you’re excited to see your kids and hear all about their day, and you get nothing but mumbled grunts in return. This is normal. It’s manageable, and it’s very, very common. After School restraint Collapse, a term coined only a few years ago. It suddenly resonated with…

Resiliency Tips That They Can Take Into Adulthood The first day of school can be frightening. It’s a new place, new people, new buildings to navigate, and new rules to learn. There are so many unknowns. For each child, the questions and anxiety are different. Whether it’s about missing home, or not knowing what to do or where to go, or the awkward phase of making new friends, it’s no surprise that our kids can feel some anxieties about this; it’s a lot. Even some adults google new places ahead of time to make sure they know what to expect; why should we expect anything braver from our kids. As parents, we want to move mountains to make sure our kids never feel stress or pain, but logically we also know that it’s a part of life. The best thing we can do is set them up with tips, tricks,…

Our annual Mabel’s Labels Ultimate Back-To-School Guide is full of tips, advice and resources to help you prepare for whatever school situation is ahead. These articles are full of useful information from real parents, experts and teachers to support your family’s transition back to the classroom. We’ve organized them into six sections to help you easily find the topics relevant to you.